Tag Archives: training

The Perfect End to a Beautiful Season

This week marks the end of the UK course season at Woodlore.

Our first course this year, the Advanced Tracking that took place in April seems so long ago and so much has happened since then. We have run a wide variety of exciting Bushcraft courses throughout East Sussex and further afield, meeting and enjoying spending time with clients from all walks of life.

Woodlore courses

Woodloreans taking notes during the salmon lecture on the Woodlore Fundamental Bushcraft course

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Swift Water Training 2014

Water is essential to life, beautiful and extremely hazardous; crossing water is one of the most dangerous undertakings in the outdoor world and the decision to do so must never be taken lightly. Inevitably though, there will come a time when the traveller is left with no choice and it is at these moments that prior experience and training become invaluable.

WASPTAR

Safe crossing depends on the affective assessment of the hazard.

When training our students to make water crossings, we encourage them to use the acronym: WASPTAR – What type of water is it? Will it be cold? Are there other hazards? Is it feasible to attempt?

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Fitness isn’t Just for Gym Bunnies

Woodlore Senior Assistant David Southey, trekking near the Devil's Kitchen in Snowdonia

Woodlore Senior Assistant David Southey, trekking near the Devil’s Kitchen in Snowdonia

You’ve skied a full day, flattened out a platform, set up your camp and set off to find, fell, retrieve and process your firewood for the night. Sat in your warm tent drinking a brew, you look over your route for tomorrow, then tea and bed, waking when it’s your shift to stoke the stove.

Fitness enables mental alertness, the capability to make quick decisions, problem solving skills and the ability to cope with fatigue. Physical robustness isn’t just about being the fastest or strongest; it’s one of the keys to the backcountry. Being able to carry out demanding tasks with ease means you’re less likely to make a simple mistake which could have serious consequences for you and those in your charge. Continue reading